Room to Grow: The Tulsa Botanical Garden to Host a Variety of Fun and Educational Events in June | Home & Garden






The Tulsa Botanical Garden will host a National Pollinator Week plant sale to encourage the important work of pollinators such as bumblebees.


Manuela Soldi, Tulsa World


Whether you’re an avid gardener or just looking for a fun summer activity, the Tulsa Botanical Garden has something for you in June.

From engaging plant workshops to kid-friendly and dog-friendly programs, the Garden has organized a varied program of indoor and outdoor events for this month.

“The main theme of our summer workshops and offerings is trying to help people have indoor experiences in the heat, because sometimes gardening in Tulsa in the summer can be brutal,” said Ellen Weatherholt, curator of the Children’s Discovery Garden at the Tulsa Botanic Garden. . “We wanted to create ways to enjoy gardens both indoors and outdoors.”

Tree Fort Storytime

On June 4 at 11 a.m., young guests are invited to visit the Children’s Discovery Garden to hear a nature-related story told by a member of the Garden’s staff. Amber Hallford, a Lakeside Promenade gardener, will read Holly Keller’s Farfallina & Marcel, a story about the lasting friendship between a caterpillar and a gosling.

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Story time is free with admission.







Tulsa Botanical Garden

Kids can head to the Children’s Discovery Garden for a nature storytelling session with a garden staff member.


Manuela Soldi, Tulsa World


national best friends day

Grab your best friend and head to the garden on June 8 for National Best Friends Day to receive two-for-one admission.







Tulsa Botanical Garden

Horticulturist July Powers is preparing the Tulsa Botanical Garden for the summer months.


Manuela Soldi, Tulsa World


Second Day of the Dog Saturday

June 11 is dedicated to the celebration of furry friends in the garden. The staff partnered with ARF Tulsa to host an on-site dog adoption as well as a giveaway from companies like Pet Supplies Plus and Dogtopia.

Visitors are encouraged to bring their own four-legged friends to enjoy the garden grounds alongside them. Paddling pools will be provided to help your pup refresh their paws after their visit.

“This partnership started because we have so many staff members who really love their pets, so we tried to find local organizations that we’d like to introduce to help get more adoptions and just educate our guests on the best ways to care for their pets,” Weatherholt said. “We got a lot of new visitors with our Dog Days because so many people like to take their pets with them wherever they go.”

This event costs regular admission and $4 for non-member dogs.







Tulsa Botanical Garden

Members and non-members of the Garden are encouraged to attend the June workshops and plant sales.


Manuela Soldi, Tulsa World


Succulent Bowl Workshop

Also on June 11, join horticulturist and nursery manager Lori Fry and design your own succulent planter.

“We grow a variety of different succulents in our garden — maybe up to 40 different kinds — and Lori will have them available for the workshop,” Weatherholt said. “Each attendee will get their own bowl and choose which succulents they would like to use, and Lori will teach them how to plant them, how best to care for them, and where to place them in your home and yard so they get a lot of Sun. “

The Garden will provide attendees with succulents of varying textures and colors, including hens and chicks (also called houseleeks), aloes, sedums and haworthia plants.

You can buy wine, beer and soft drinks. Registration for the workshop is mandatory and costs $35 for garden members and $40 for non-members.







Tulsa Botanical Garden

The Tulsa Botanical Garden offers activities for all ages during the month of June.


Manuela Soldi, Tulsa World


flag day

On June 14, each guest will receive a free mini American flag in honor of Flag Day.

Fathers Day

All dads who visit the Garden on June 19 will receive a gift with paid admission or a membership ticket.







Tulsa Botanical Garden

June is a particularly busy time for pollinators like butterflies, said Ellen Weatherholt, curator of the Children’s Discovery Garden.


Manuela Soldi, Tulsa World


National Pollinator Week Plant Sale

In honor of National Pollinator Week, the Garden will host a plant sale from June 21 to 26. Customers can purchase a variety of plants that feed the butterflies, bees, hummingbirds and other pollinators that maintain our ecosystem.

“We really love supporting our pollinators here at the Garden — they’re a big part of what we do here,” Weatherholt said. “We grow a lot of plants here to help pollinators. We have nectariferous plants where adults can feed and collect pollen, and also host plants for the larval stages of different insects – the plants that insects eat to become adult butterflies or beetles.

This month of June will commemorate the first time that the Garden has organized a sale of pollinating plants.

“It’s something that’s getting a lot of interest – a lot of people start gardening with pollinators in mind, trying to attract them to their garden,” Weatherholt said. “We try to support that and help them connect with the perfect plants for their gardens. If you add (pollinators) to your garden, you will see more beautiful things every year.

Pollinators play an essential role in our environment and are essential not only for other animals, but also for humans, Weatherholt said.

“Pollinators are essential to the life cycle of so many plants, animals, and fungi — basically everything that makes up our world,” Weatherholt said. “They help plants complete their life cycle, and if plants aren’t pollinated, we and other animals won’t have anything to eat. We need to make sure we have enough habitat for these pollinators, so they can do their job all over Oklahoma, and the world too – they power everything else.

Garden members will receive a 10% discount on all plant sales. Le Jardin only accepts credit cards, Google Pay and Apple Pay.







Tulsa Botanical Garden

Guests can create their own sensory fairy garden on June 24.


Manuela Soldi, Tulsa World


Make a Sensory Fairy Garden Workshop

Children and adults can explore the whimsical world of fairy gardens during the Garden Workshop on June 24.

“Our educational staff compiles a pick list of different herbs and other aspects of these bowls to help children feel independence and gain knowledge about plants,” Weatherholt said. “We’ll have grasses with fuzzy leaves, some with strong stems and some that smell differently than others, as well as fun things to accessorize fairy gardens – textured stones, marbles and bark, and toy bugs and butterflies to encourage kids to engage with plants and bring home something they can play with and imagine.

Attendees can choose from herbs like oregano, thyme and parsley to add to their fairy garden to take home and use for cooking in different seasons, Weatherholt said.

Kits can be purchased for $25 for garden members (or $30 on the day of) and $30 for non-members (or $35 on the day of). Admission must be purchased separately for each participant.

Early morning members

On June 28, members are encouraged to skip the lines (and the heat!) and enjoy the Garden early in the morning, before it officially opens for the day. Take a stroll through the park, practice your photography and observe the many birds and other animal species in the garden before the hubbub of the day begins. Members can visit the Garden from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

The ultimate goal of the Garden’s June lineup is to reach more people — especially children — and show them all of the wonderful facets of plant life and gardening, Weatherholt said.

“We have a large audience of interested and engaged adults, but we also like being able to engage families who might want to visit us,” Weatherholt said. “We want to immerse different audiences. Kids love visiting the garden, so we love helping them make things they can take home so they can continue learning about gardening, even when they’re not around.

For more information, tickets and event times, visit tulsabotanic.org.

Dora W. Clawson